Laura Snoad

I am London-based freelance journalist specialising in design, arts and culture.

Formerly the features editor at Grand Designs Magazine, I have also worked on staff at Marketing Week and Design Week.

You can also find my writing in Grafik, Digital Arts and onoffice.

Available for projects and commissions.

Email me at hello@laurasnoad.co.uk.

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76 posts tagged design

Grafik news round-up: I’ve worked on some great stories since we launched on Monday, here are some of the best.

Jon Burgerman’s Tumblr Girls show explores the visual culture blossoming from the microblogging platform and other social networking sites. Design studio Atyp was inspired by explorations into rhythm, randomness and metaphysics, to create a short film using a Cinema 4D dynamics engine. Colchester’s Firstsite gallery exhibits the work of late French avant-garde poet Henri Chopin, whose interest in chaos and form stretched from sound art to graphic concrete poems made using a typewriter. And finally, we gear up for Cheltenham Design Festival. 

The verb ‘to scan’ is one of those rare semantic enigmas in the English language where a word means both one thing and simultaneously its opposite. Like cleave or sanction, this peculiar quirk entails that the act of scanning can involve just a quick, cursory glance or an in-depth viewing, recorded with great scrutiny. It’s an idea that piqued the interest of Jo Stockham, the RCA’s head of printmaking, when she was tasked with curating Liverpool gallery The Bluecoat’s new exhibition The Negligent Eye. 

For this piece for the newly launched Grafik site, I talked to Jo about how the show explores the ways printmaking has moved on from a traditional craft dialogue to include digital technologies, three-dimensional forms and new ways of image-making. 

Once described as ‘William Morris on acid’, Scottish textiles designers Paul Simmons and Alistair McAuley have made a name for themselves with their eccentric wallpapers and fabrics under their Timorous Beasties moniker. Combining vibrant psychedelia with a sense of humour, they’re probably best known for their Glasgow Toile – a design that depicts the city’s tower blocks and fabrics in the style of the traditional French fabric.

For this Grand Designs Magazine feature, I caught up with Paul and Alistair to chat about their Glasgow studio and two-decade partnership. Read it here.

Jasper Morrison is one of the world’s most respected industrial designers. Working on everything from cutlery to tram carriages, his elegant, pared-back aesthetic prioritises function over superfluous features.

For this Grand Designs Magazine feature, I caught up with the London-born, Tokyo-based designer to discuss his studio life and what makes him tick. Read it here.

Digital agencies Syzygy and Unique have collaborated with artist Rob Lawrence to realise an artwork first imagined by Marcel Duchamp in 1913, using lines of light to map the unpredictable journey of the incoming tide.

For this piece for POST Matter, I spoke to Mark Ellis about the incredible artwork dreamed up by Duchamp, and the technical innovation that brought his vision into reality.

Formerly the design director at Established & Sons, London-based furniture designer Sebastian Wrong is known for championing dramatic work that uses materials in unexpected ways. Last month it was announced that Wrong would be masterminding a new UK-based brand for Danish design company Hay – aptly called Wrong for Hay – that would feature pieces from well-known designers such as Stefan Diez and Bartian Pot, as well as in-house concepts.

For this feature for Grand Designs Magazine feature, I caught up with the man-of-the-minute designs to talk about his busy London life. Read it here.

‘A lot of people can’t believe that this space is in the city,’ says Jo Springthorpe of the dramatic glass home she and husband Jeff have built in a leafy suburb of South Africa’s Cape Town. ‘It has such a strong feeling of being completely surrounded by nature.’

It’s an atmosphere that Jo, a stylist, and Jeff, who works in fashion retail, were keen to cultivate. With views of Table Mountain on one side and the rooftops of Cape Town stretching down to the bay on the other, it’s not surprising they decided to create what is effectively a giant viewfinder, which frames the jaw-dropping vistas – you can even see the mountains from the bath. 

For this Grand Designs Magazine feature, I spoke to Jo about her how she built her nature-inspired home. Check it out here.

This project by Mork Ulnes Architects got round San Francisco’s strict planning laws by extending upwards and 4.5 metres behind the original building’s facade, which adds an extra 60 square metres to the floor plan. Read the full feature here.

Guns and furniture very rarely occupy the same breath in the design world, at least not since the Design Museum courted controversy when it announced the introduction of the Kalashnikov AK-47 into its permanent collection in 2011. But Royal College of Art graduate James Shaw has created a series of organically shaped pieces made by firing molten or pre-mixed materials from spray-guns made to his own specifications.

In this interview for The LiP, I chatted to shaw about how he made these incredible pieces and what this kind of production could mean for design’s relationship with sustainability. 

Part of my role at Grand Designs Magazine is to digest industry news and trends for a consumer audience. Here’s my pick of the best new products for the month of June. Take a look here.

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